Last edited by Arami
Saturday, May 2, 2020 | History

2 edition of Argentine constitutional law found in the catalog.

Argentine constitutional law

Santos P. Amadeo

Argentine constitutional law

the judicial function in the maintenance of the federal system and the preservation of individual rights

by Santos P. Amadeo

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Published by Columbia University Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Constitutional law -- Argentina.,
  • Federal government -- Argentina -- History.,
  • Civil rights -- Argentina -- History.,
  • Argentina -- Politics and government.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Santos P. Amadeo ; with a foreword by L.S. Rowe.
    SeriesColumbia legal studies -- no. 4
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 243 p. ;
    Number of Pages243
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16587419M

      The book gives a very thorough overview of the history, organization, and development of guerrilla movements, as well as providing significant insights into the guerrillas' behavior A valuable contribution to literature on guerrilla movements, political violence, and Argentine history."—Deborah L. Norden, American Political Science Review. Coordinates. Argentina (Spanish: [aɾxenˈtina]), officially the Argentine Republic (Spanish: República Argentina), is a country located mostly in the southern half of South g the bulk of the Southern Cone with Chile to the west, the country is also bordered by Bolivia and Paraguay to the north, Brazil to the northeast, Uruguay and the South Atlantic Ocean to the east, and the Capital and largest city: Buenos Aires, 34°36′S .

    Aglion's book-not of the mouvement-regret might be expressed at its lack of historical depth, and at the absence of supporting references. J. G. HEINBERG. University of Missouri. Argentine Constitutional Law. BY SANTOS P. AMADEO. (New York: Columbia University Press. Pp. x, $).   The current version is the Argentine Constitution of as amended by Law of []. There are several different English translations available, and Author: Lisa Winkler.

    ‘This book will be most useful to students of Spanish and Spanish American constitutional history, and is a serious addition to the literature.' Juan Bautista Alberdi and the Intellectual Origins of Argentine Constitutionalism.” Hastings Constitutional Law Quarterly 2 Cited by: 1. He studied Law at the University of Buenos Aires, where he graduated with honors, and did his MSc in Political Theory and his PhD in Law at the LSE. His main research interests are Public International Law, International Criminal Law, International Humanitarian Law, and Constitutional Law, with special interest in philosophical and empirical.


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Argentine constitutional law by Santos P. Amadeo Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Constitution of Argentina is the basic governing document of Argentina, and the primary source of existing law in Argentina. Its first version was written in by a Constitutional Assembly gathered in Santa Fe, and the doctrinal basis was taken in part from the United States was then reformed in, (which mainly repealed the reform), and.

Book Review | February 01 Argentine Constitutional Law Argentine Constitutional Law. By Amadeo, Santos P. Foreword by Rowe, L. [Number IV of the Columbia Legal Studies, edited under the auspices of the Faculty of Law of Columbia University, Edwin W.

Patterson, Argentine constitutional law book by: 1. This essay introduces an online edition of Santos P. Amadeo’s Argentine Constitutional Law to be published by the Argentine constitutional law book Puertorriqueña de Jurisprudencia y Legislación.

Tracing the book to its origins in a paper Amadeo wrote for a seminar in comparative constitutional law at Columbia Law School in the s, we discuss the intellectual. Get this from a library. Argentine constitutional law: the judicial function in the maintenance of the federal system and the preservation of individual rights.

[Santos P Amadeo]. Doctor Amadeo's book constitutes a case study. With a truly pro-digious effort he has collected and analyzed a large number of Argentinian decisions on those branches of constitutional law which are indicated in the subtitle of his book: the relations between the federal government and the provinces, and the preservation of individual by: 2.

The Legal system of Argentina is a Civil law legal pillar of the Civil system is the Constitution of Argentina ().

The Argentine Constitution of was an attempt to unite the unstable and young country of the United Provinces of the Rio de la Plata under a single law, creating as well the different organisms needed to run a country. This constitution was finally approved. Derived from the renowned multi-volume International Encyclopaedia of Laws, this very useful analysis of constitutional law in Argentina provides essential information on the country’s sources of constitutional law, its form of government, and its administrative s who handle transnational matters will appreciate the clarifications of particular terminology and its application.

In his foreword to La doctrina del precedente en la Corte Suprema, Alejandro Garro, an Argentine academic who teaches at Columbia Law School in New York, claims that this monograph by Alberto F.

Garay is the first book in Spanish to examine in depth the doctrine of is certainly safe to say that Garay’s book is the first lengthy contribution to the analysis of the doctrine of Author: Santiago Legarre.

violation of the constitutional provision prohibiting diminution of the judges' compen-sation. Under these circumstances, the publication of a book on Argentine constitutional law is of more than passing interest. Amadeo's book is divided into three parts. A description of the background of the Argentine Constitution, adopted inis con-Author: Sidney B.

Jacoby. Get this from a library. Argentine constitutional law: the judicial function in the maintenance of the federal system and the preservation of individual rights. [Santos P Amadeo] -- A study of the constitutional law and system of Argentina, with special reference to the role of the judicial department in maintaining the federal system and protecting individual rights.

Erin F. Delaney, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law, and Christina D. Ponsa-Kraus, have posted Beholding Law: Amadeo on the Argentine Constitution, the introduction to Santos P. Amadeo, Argentine Constitutional Law () (, and Christina D.

Ponsa-Kraus, have posted Beholding Law: Amadeo on the Argentine Constitution, the introduction. The author claims—and here I agree with him—that the Argentine system enjoys neither the benefits of common-law stare decisis which, upon unifying case law, favors legal certainty, nor the benefits of a unified constitutional jurisdiction—in Kelsen’s European centralized model of judicial review, with an independent specialized court Author: Alberto B.

Bianchi. This Guide to Law Online Argentina contains a selection of Argentine legal, juridical, and governmental sources accessible through the Internet.

Links provide access to primary documents, legal commentary, and general government information about specific jurisdictions and topics. Constitutional law; an introductory treatise designed for use in the United States naval academy, and in other schools where the principles of the Constitution are studied, (Annapolis, Md., The United States naval institute, ), by H.

Fenton and United States. Constitution (page images at HathiTrust). An internationally recognized scholar on Latin American legal institutions, with a focus on Argentine Constitutionalism, Jonathan Miller began his affiliation with Argentina in earnest as a Fulbright Scholar and Jervey Fellow from Columbia's Parker School of Comparative and International Law, and later worked there through a grant from the J.

Roderick McArthur Foundation. Argentine Supreme Court followed the U.S. example, continental European public law has exercised an increasingly important influence in the interpreta-tion and development of constitutional law in Argentina. This influence has been particularly important in administrative.

Although the constitution of the United States had exerted a far-reaching influence on Alberdi, whose work on the "Bases of the Argentine Constitution" was used as a constitutional guide by the convention ofthe direct influence of the constitution of the United States on the Argentine system is more clearly seen in the constitutional.

ARGENTINA: A CHRONOLOGY AND FACT BOOK 10 (); contra Quintana, Comparison of the Constitutional Basis of the United States and Argentine Political Systems, 97 U. REv. Many of the similarities between the Argentine Constitution and the U.S. Constitu-Cited by: 2. The Supreme Court of Argentina (Corte Suprema de Justicia de la Nación) is the highest court on all federal and constitutional matters and it sits at the apex of the Argentine Judiciary.

It was established by the Constitution of (Constitution of the Argentine Nation: 1 May (Arg)), following the model of the Supreme Court of the. Basic Structure of the Argentine Legal System.

The Republic of Argentina (República Argentina) is ruled by a National Constitution (Constitución de la Nación Argentina). This Constitution states that Argentina is a federal country with three levels of state – federal, provincial and local — and it is based on the republican doctrine of.

Source of All Reason and Justice. Religious Liberty and Church-State Relations in Argentine Constitutional Law Fuente de toda razón. Libertad religiosa y relaciones Iglesia-Estado en el derecho constitucional argentino. pages Argentina; Editorial Universidad Adventista del Plata; South America:: Argentina.

Page last updated on Febru The World Factbook Country/Location Flag Modal. South America:: Argentina Print. Flag Description. three equal horizontal bands of sky blue (top), white, and sky blue; centered in the white band is a radiant yellow sun with a human face (delineated in brown) known as the Sun.

"The text of the Argentine constitution is a translation by the editor from the Spanish text issued by the Bureau of American republics." "The constitution of Brazil has been translated from the Portugese and the translation compared with that issued by the Bureau of American republics." Bibliography: p.

47,